For lessons on longevity, you’d be remiss not to at least consider the morning habits of people from the Blue Zones (Ikaria, Greece; Loma Linda, California; Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan; and Nicoya, Costa Rica), where residents consistently live to see their 100th birthdays.

Dan Buettner, the author and explorer who’s pioneered research on longevity hotspots, made it his mission to share exactly what people from these regions do throughout their lives that keeps them so healthy. From the low-protein diet, to the importance of community and connection, the sharing of knowledge is meant to help others live longer lives, too. A few of these habits can be practiced in the morning, as soon as we wake up, to kickstart our day.

4 morning habits for longevity, inspired by the Blue Zones

1. Find your ‘ikigai’

When you wake up in the morning, what gets you out of bed? What’s your drive? Finding whatever that is and embracing it fully is one of the habits embraced by the residents of at least one of the Blue Zones.

The Japanese concept of ikigai is about to discovering what sparks your soul and leading life with purpose. According to the Blue Zones, having a purpose is linked to longevity; it literally gives you a reason to get out of bed in the morning as you age.

If you’re not sure where to begin, Ken Mogi, a neuroscientist and author of Awakening Your Ikigaipreviously told Well+Good how to tap into that inner magic. The process, Mogi says, usually starts by embracing five pillars: starting small, accepting yourself, connecting with others and the planet, finding joy in little things, and being present.

2. Don’t skip a healthy breakfast

Unsurprisingly, a healthy diet is an important part of becoming a centenarian. Buettner says that sticking to nutritious eating plans, like a plant-based diet or the Mediterranean diet, can help fuel a long, healthy life. A part of this includes the most important meal of the day: eating breakfast.

One woman—a 105-year-old living in Loma Linda, California—swears by starting her day with a hearty bowl of slow-cooked oatmeal. Topped with fiber-friendly dates, wholesome walnuts, and a splash of protein-packed soy milk, it’s a super easy meal to make in the morning. Buettner says she follows each bowl with a “prune juice shooter” that helps to get things moving while reducing blood pressure and cholesterol.

Here’s everything you need to know about the Mediterranean diet:



3. Enjoy a cup of morning coffee

People who live in the five Blue Zones, savor their morning cup of joe. “[People in these areas] drink up to two or three cups of black coffee per day,” according to Blue Zones. “The American Heart Association found that consuming coffee, both caffeinated and decaf, was associated with a lower risk of total mortality.”

Now, that doesn’t mean you should go loading up your cup with sweet cream lattes and sugar. Instead, opt for a plant-based milk alternative and natural sweetener, like oat milk and agave. Or, switch it up with tea—another staple longer-living people love to indulge in around the world. “To really blue zones your coffee or tea routine, make coffee or afternoon tea dates with friends or family to chat, laugh, and get that face-to-face time that’s so important to health and happiness,” says Blue Zones.

The benefits of coffee, explained by a dietitian:

4. Say something nice to the first person you see

Sarah Wilson, an Australian journalist and author of First, We Make The Beast Beautiful: A New Story on Anxiety, once asked Buettner for his own morning routine. In addition to eating a healthy breakfast (full of fruits and grains) and doing 20-minutes of exercise (usually yoga or a bike ride to work), Buettner starts each morning by genuinely complimenting others. 

“Say something nice to the first person we meet,” he wrote in an email to Wilson. “A Harvard study shows that behaviors are contagious so if you do it to your neighbor, it’s likely to come back to you.”

Considering how important connection to community and meaningful human relationships are in Blue Zones, it’s likely Buettner picked this up from his research. In addition to sparking this emotional ripple effect, find your community and cultivate a healthy social life. Whether it’s first thing in the morning or throughout the day, the connections we make lead to happier, longer lives.

Oh hi! You look like someone who loves free workouts, discounts for cult-fave wellness brands, and exclusive Well+Good content. Sign up for Well+, our online community of wellness insiders, and unlock your rewards instantly.  

Our editors independently select these products. Making a purchase through our links may earn Well+Good a commission.



Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here