Anderton took his first ginger harvest within a matter of six months, but usually, the longer you leave your plant in the ground, the more it will grow and its flavor will develop.

Anderton has found that winter, when the plant begins to “die down” and go dormant, is a great time to carefully dig it out of the ground and try it out. Once the plant stops expending its energy on new growth above ground, he says, flavor gets stored in its underbelly, leading to more of that signature spiciness.

Wash off your harvest and use it to brew a soothing tea, shake up a spritz, or round out a stir fry—and don’t forget to save some to pop back into the ground for next year.



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